2012 Summit

Latest Trends in Ediscovery

About the theme: Beginning with the proposed rule changes to the FRCP, and focusing on new technologies in litigation and in the practice of business, the 2012 Boston Ediscovery Summit created a forum for dialogue about the latest trends in ediscovery. 

2012 Overview

The 2012 Boston eDiscovery Summit featured the following speakers:

Opening Keynote:

  • The Honorable Shira A. Scheindlin, U.S. District Court for the Southern District of New York; author of the ground-breaking Zubulake decisions. Judge Scheindlin will speak on “Proposed Ediscovery Amendments to the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure.” (You Tube Video – Click Here)

Judge’s Panel:

  • The Honorable Robert B. Collings, U.S. Magistrate Judge for the District of Massachusetts
  • The Honorable Andrew J. Peck, U.S. Magistrate Judge for the Southern District of New York
  • Moderator: Dana Conneally, Esq., Evidox Corporation

 (You Tube Video – Click Here)

Practitioners:

  • Jonathan Sablone, Esq., Partner and Chair of Ediscovery and Digital Evidence, Nixon Peabody LLP. Mr. Sablone will speak on “Predictive Coding.” (You Tube Video – Click Here)
  • James Berriman, Esq., CEO of Evidox and Lecturer in Law on Ediscovery at Boston University School of Law. Mr. Berriman will speak on “When Your Client’s Data is in the Cloud.”  (You Tube Video – Click Here)

2012 Speakers


Keynote speakers:

The Honorable Shira A. Scheindlin is a U.S. District Judge for the Southern District of New York. She presided over the well-known Zubulake v UBS Warburg case in which she authored a series of influential decisions that helped define the concepts of accessibility, undue burden, and cost-shifting in the context of ediscovery. As a member of the Judicial Conference on the Rules of Civil Procedure from 1998 to 2006, she participated in drafting the 2006 ediscovery Amendments to the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure. She is on the faculty of Brooklyn Law School as an Adjunct Professor. She was formerly Assistant US Attorney for the Eastern District of New York, General Counsel to the New York City Department of Investigation, U.S. Magistrate Judge for the Eastern District of New York, and a member of the Civil Justice Reform Act Advisory Group. She is a well-known speaker on the topic of ediscovery.

Panel of Judges:

The Honorable Robert B. Collings is a U.S. Magistrate Judge for the District of Massachusetts. He was formerly a prosecutor at the U.S. Attorney’s Office where he became Chief of the Criminal Division and then First Assistant U.S. Attorney. He has lectured at various schools and seminars.

The Honorable Andrew J. Peck is a U.S. Magistrate Judge for Southern District of New York and has served as Chief Magistrate Judge. He has written several influential opinions on the topic of ediscovery, including the use of predictive coding. Judge Peck served as law clerk to Judge Paul Roney of the 11th Circuit and is a former litigator with the law firm of Paul, Weiss, Rifkind, Wharton & Garrison. Judge Peck is on the faculty of Cardozo Law School as an Adjunct Professor where he teaches pretrial practice. Judge Peck is a frequent speaker on topics relating to electronic discovery.

Dana Conneally, panel moderator. Mr. Conneally is a partner at Evidoxwhere he specializes in ediscovery project management and consulting. He is also responsible for identifying developing technologies that can be utilized to mitigate risk, increase productivity, and reduce costs related to the discovery process. He was formerly National Manager of Litigation Technology at Goodwin Procter LLP where he was responsible for overseeing a team of sixteen ediscovery professionals across all Goodwin offices. Mr. Conneally received his J.D. from Suffolk University Law School and his B.A. from Gordon College.

Practitioners:

Jonathan Sablone is a litigation partner at Nixon Peabody LLP. His multi-faceted trial practice includes representing large companies in complex commercial litigation matters, as well as hedge funds and institutional investors in alternative investment vehicles. Jonathan also leads Nixon Peabody’s eDiscovery & Digital Evidence practice. Through his efforts, the firm has developed an integrated approach that standardizes the electronic discovery process across all of the firm’s offices and litigation practice groups. Jonathan works closely with clients’ in-house counsel and information technology professionals, providing guidance in litigation preparedness, evidence preservation, and electronic data collection, review, and production. His grasp of relevant regulations, successful practices, and proven strategies turns eDiscovery & digital evidence from a costly burden to a competitive strength for clients. Jon received his J.D. from Boston College Law School and his A.B., cum laude, from Harvard College.

James Berriman is CEO of Evidox where he specializes in ediscovery and litigation technology consulting. He is also Lecturer in Law at Boston University School of Law where he teaches ediscovery. Mr. Berriman has been developing and supporting litigation-technology systems since 1982. From 1990 to 2006, he was a litigation attorney at Goodwin Procter LLP. In 1999, he founded the firm’s Litigation Technology Group and took on the additional role of Director of Litigation Technology. He coded and implemented the firm’s litigation case-management system and established the firm’s scanning labs, ediscovery review facilities, and trial technology systems. Mr. Berriman received his law degree cum laudefrom Boston University where he was Articles Editor of the Boston University Law Review. He received his bachelor’s degree summa cum laude from the State University of New York, Potsdam College with a major in philosophy.

 

2011 Summit

Ediscovery on a Budget

Many litigators assume that electronic discovery applies only to major lawsuits involving multi-national corporations and vast repositories of electronic documents. They associate ediscovery with huge costs, large teams of expensive attorneys, and deep in-house technical resources. Read more about the 2011 Summit by clicking on the expandable headlines below.

2011 Overview

The 2011 Boston eDiscovery Summit featured the following speakers:

  • Steven S. Gensler, Professor of Law at the University of Oklahoma College of Law and author of “Federal Rules of Civil Procedure: Rules and Commentary” (West);
  • Ralph Losey, Partner and National eDiscovery Counsel at Jackson Lewis LLP and author of “Adventures in Ediscovery” (West);
  • A panel of judges, including Tim Hillman (Magistrate Judge, D. Mass.), Steve Neel (JAMS, former Massachusetts Superior Court Judge, Business Session), and Allan van Gestel (JAMS, former Massachusetts Superior Court Judge, Business Session);
  • A panel of ediscovery practitioners, including a litigation attorney, ediscovery counsel, in-house litigation-support counsel, and an associate general counsel;
  • A “lightning panel” of Boston’s best ediscovery problem-solvers.

About the theme: Many litigators assume that electronic discovery applies only to major lawsuits involving multi-national corporations and vast repositories of electronic documents. They associate ediscovery with huge costs, large teams of expensive attorneys, and deep in-house technical resources.

But today, virtually every corporation is likely to possess electronic evidence that is potentially subject to discovery. Even a small dispute is likely to involve electronically-stored information. And even the smallest law firm will sometimes be faced with the need to conduct ediscovery.

Further, even large corporations and large law firms often have small matters that must be handled economically.

The modern litigator therefore must know how to conduct “affordable ediscovery.” The litigator must satisfy the requirements of the rules of procedure while keeping the discovery budget proportionate to the amount in dispute.

This seminar will explore the use of ediscovery in civil litigation in three scenarios:

  • The litigation matter that does not justify a large discovery budget;
  • The litigation client that does not have a large discovery budget;
  • The law firm that does not have large in-house resources for ediscovery.

The seminar presented methods for implementing smaller-scale ediscovery techniques to address these lower-budget scenarios.


2011 Speakers


Keynote speakers:

Professor Steven S. Gensler, University of Oklahoma College of Law. Professor Gensler teaches courses on civil procedure, conflict of laws, federal courts, complex litigation, and alternative dispute resolution. He joined the OU law faculty in 2000 after serving two years as a Visiting Assistant Professor at the University of Illinois College of Law. During 2003-04, Professor Gensler was the Supreme Court Fellow at the Administrative Office of the United States Courts.

Professor Gensler currently serves as a member of the United States Judicial Conference Advisory Committee on Civil Rules. He is also a member of the Local Civil Rules Committee for the Western District of Oklahoma and of the Oklahoma Bar Association’s Civil Procedure Committee. Professor Gensler is the author of Federal Rules of Civil Procedure: Rules and Commentary (West) and a variety of articles on federal and Oklahoma practice and procedure. His recent scholarship has focused on the rulemaking process, electronic discovery, and class actions.

Professor Gensler began his legal career as a law clerk to the Honorable Deannell Reece Tacha on the United States Court of Appeals for the Tenth Circuit (1992-93) and to the Honorable Kathryn H. Vratil on the United States District Court for the District of Kansas (1993-94). He then worked as a litigation associate in Milwaukee, Wisconsin for four years, most recently with Michael, Best & Friedrich, LLP. Professor Gensler was admitted to the Wisconsin Bar in 1994 and is a member of the American Bar Association and the Wisconsin Bar Association. He was elected to membership in the American Law Institute in 2006.

Ralph Losey, Partner and National Ediscovery Counsel, Jackson Lewis LLP. Mr. Losey is an attorney in private practice and is also an Adjunct Professor at the University of Florida College of Law teaching e-discovery and advanced e-discovery. Ralph is also a prolific author of e-discovery books and articles, having written more on the subject than anyone in the industry, including four books in the past four years. His newest book, Adventures in Electronic Discovery, was published by West in May 2011. His third book, also by West, was published in 2010, Electronic Discovery: New Ideas, Trends, Case Law, and Practices. It included contributing chapters by Judge Shira Scheindlin, Jason Baron, and others. He has previously written the American Bar Association’s feature books on electronic discovery for 2008 and 2009: Introduction to e-Discovery, (ABA 2009); and, e-Discovery: Current Trends and Cases (ABA 2008).

Mr. Losey is also the author of the well known law review article on the mathematics underlying e-discovery: HASH: the New Bates Stamp, 12 Journal of Technology Law & Policy 1 (June 2007). In early 2009 Ralph wrote a now frequently referenced article on the ethics underlying e-discovery: Lawyers Behaving Badly: Understanding Unprofessional Conduct in e-Discovery, 60 Mercer L. Rev. 983 (Spring 2009). Ralph’s most recent law review article was written for The Sedona Conference, Mancia v. Mayflower Begins a Pilgrimage to the New World of Cooperation, The Sedona Conference Journal (Winter 2009), on an important new collaborative approach to discovery.

Panel of Judges:

Hon. Allan van Gestel, Justice, Massachusetts Superior Court (ret.); Arbitrator. JAMS. Judge van Gestel has more than 49 years of experience handling complex civil litigation matters and is an expert at resolving business and commercial disputes. Prior to becoming an arbitrator, he served as the founding and presiding Justice of the innovative Business Litigation Session of the Massachusetts Superior Court, a position he held for seven years.

Hon. Timothy Hillman, Magistrate Judge, U. S. District Court, District of Massachusetts. Hon. Timothy S. Hillman, Magistrate Judge, U. S. District Court, District of Massachusetts. Judge Hillman was appointed to the Court February 13, 2006. Prior to that appointment, he served as a Justice for the Massachusetts Superior Court and served as Presiding Justice in both the Worcester District Court and the Gardner District Court. Prior to his appointment to the District Court, he served as Town Counsel to the towns of Petersham, Athol, and Lunenburg, and City Solicitor to the cities of Gardner and Fitchburg. He was employed as a staff attorney at the law firm of Murphy and Pusateri in Fitchburg and later in private practice, also in Fitchburg. From 1975 to 1979 he was employed as an Assistant District Attorney for Worcester County. Magistrate Judge Hillman has taught courses on trial advocacy at Clark University, and law and psychiatry at Massachusetts School of Law. He has also taught countless continuing legal education programs on topics including evidence, juries and expert witnesses. While in the Superior Court, Magistrate Judge Hillman was Project Executive for MassCourts, the Massachusetts Trial Court’s Information Technology Project. Magistrate Judge Hillman is a graduate of Coe College in Cedar Rapids, Iowa and Suffolk University Law School in Boston, Massachusetts.

Hon. Stephen E. Neel, Justice, Massachusetts Superior Court (ret.); Arbitrator, JAMS. Judge Neel has extensive experience resolving a wide spectrum of complex civil litigation having served 18 years as a trial judge on the Massachusetts Superior Court and 19 years as a trial attorney in private practice concentrating in complex civil litigation. He was appointed to the Massachusetts Superior Court in 1992 and presided in the Business Litigation Session during 2008 to 2010. Moreover, Judge Neel served on the Supreme Judicial Court’s Standing Committee on Dispute Resolution and chaired the Superior Court’s Subcommittee on Alternative Dispute Resolution.

Moderator:
James Berriman, CEO, Evidox. Jim is CEO of Evidox where he specializes in ediscovery and litigation technology consulting. He is also Lecturer in Law at Boston University School of Law where he teaches ediscovery. Jim has been developing and supporting litigation-technology systems since 1982. From 1990 to 2006, he was a litigation attorney at Goodwin Procter LLP where he founded the firm’s Litigation Technology Group and grew it to a team of 15 specialists. He coded and implemented the firm’s litigation case-management system and he established the firm’s scanning labs, ediscovery review facilities, and trial technology systems. Jim received his law degree cum laude from Boston University, where he was Articles Editor of the Boston University Law Review, and his bachelor’s degree summa cum laude from the State University of New York, Potsdam College.

Panel of Practitioners:

John Commisso, Litigation Attorney, LibbyHoopes PC. John focuses his practice in the areas of white collar criminal defense, government investigations, internal corporate investigations, and complex civil litigation. John has represented clients in a wide range of government investigations, criminal proceedings, and civil litigation in state and federal courts. For example, John has experience representing companies, business executives, and private individuals, in cases involving allegations of securities fraud, investment advisor fraud, healthcare and Medicare fraud, accounting fraud, public corruption, obstruction of justice, embezzlement, money laundering, structuring of financial transactions, and false claims against the government. John has advised clients in connection with enforcement actions and investigations undertaken by state and federal agencies, including the U.S. Department of Justice, the U.S. Attorney’s Office, the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission, the National Association of Securities Dealers, FINRA, the Massachusetts Attorney General’s Office, the Massachusetts Securities Division, and local District Attorney’s Offices.

Christopher P. Silva, ESI Counsel, Edwards Wildman Palmer LLP. In his ten years as an attorney with the Firm, Chris has represented clients in matters ranging from simple debt collection and defamation claims to complex commercial disputes and multimillion-dollar Hatch Waxman litigations. He has represented clients in trials before state courts in Massachusetts and Maine, in federal courts including those in New York, Connecticut, and Texas, and in multiple private mediations and arbitrations. Over the course of his practice, Chris has developed an expertise in the complicated and ubiquitous area of electronic discovery and currently serves as Edwards Wildman’s ESI Counsel. He has managed the discovery phase of several large-scale patent litigations, each of which involved sophisticated technology, international document collection, and multilingual document processing. Chris consults regularly on the topic of electronic discovery and has trained colleagues, clients, and other practitioners on related subjects. Most recently, Chris has focused his efforts on intellectual property litigation while also maintaining an active docket of commercial cases. He particularly relishes the opportunities that IP litigation affords him to gain in-depth knowledge about various and diverse scientific fields and technologies.

Jaren D. Wilcoxson, Counsel, Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Jay Wilcoxson joined MIT as Counsel in the Office of the General Counsel in August, 2007. His responsibilities include managing the Institute’s legal process and litigation and providing advice in connection with a wide variety of Institute affairs and student life issues, including compliance, risk management, disciplinary matters, and internal investigations. Before coming to MIT, Mr. Wilcoxson practiced law for a decade at the Boston law firm Goodwin Procter LLP, where he became a partner in 2005. As a litigation attorney, he represented businesses in a broad range of commercial disputes, with a particular emphasis on trademark and copyright cases. He was a member of the firm’s hiring committee and was actively involved in leading firm training initiatives and serving as a mentor to junior associates. Mr. Wilcoxson graduated from the University of Vermont and Boston University School of Law, where he was an editor for the Boston University Law Review. He is a member of the National Association of College and University attorneys and the Boston Bar Association.

Chris Zambuto, Attorney, Millennium Pharmaceuticals. Chris is an attorney with a background in information technology. During the course of his sixteen-year career at Millennium Pharmaceuticals, he has been involved in Research & Development, IT and network infrastructure, litigation preparedness, and responding to discovery requests. He is licensed to practice law in Massachusetts and is a registered with the United States Patent and Trademark Office as a Patent Attorney. Chris currently handles litigation and discovery issues as well as records management.

Lightning-Round Speakers:

Dana Conneally, Esq., Partner, Evidox. Prior to joining Evidox, Dana was National Manager of Litigation Technology, Goodwin Procter LLP. He has been managing complex litigation discovery projects since 2000. His experience includes electronic data preservation, collection, review, and production. At Evidox, Dana is responsible for identifying developing technologies that can be utilized to mitigate risk, increase productivity, and reduce costs related to the discovery process. He received his law degree from Suffolk University School of Law and his B.A. from Gordon College.

Marciann Dunnagan, Esq., Executive Director, Special Counsel, Boston. Marciann partners with law firms and corporate legal departments to determine the proper staffing model for their direct hire and temporary legal staffing and document review needs. Marciann began her career in the legal staffing industry in 1992. After a brief period of practicing law, she joined a national staffing agency and held a variety of positions, including Managing Director of their Boston office and Regional Manager, with oversight of seven offices. In September 2002, Marciann joined Special Counsel as the Executive Director of their Boston office. Since that time, Marciann continues to work with law firms and corporations regarding contract legal staffing. She assists her clients with staffing document reviews projects as well as managed reviews which consist of over 75 contract attorneys on projects which are housed both locally and/or in Special Counsel’s TurnKey Legal Centers throughout the United States. Marciann has over 19 years of experience within the legal placement industry and is involved in the local American Legal Administrator’s Association, The Massachusetts Paralegal Association, and the Women’s Bar Association. She received her Bachelor of Science Degree, Evening Division, at Western New England College while working as a paralegal in a law firm in Holyoke, Massachusetts. Marciann received her J.D. from Capital University Law School in Columbus, Ohio.

John L. Palumbo, Senior Litigation Support Manager, Foley Hoag. John has managed hundreds of large, complex litigation projects and specializes in the management of multi-site, multi-party, multi-vendor document productions involving the identification, collection, preservation, processing, and production of large document populations, comprised of both paper and electronically stored information. He has established functioning, highly successful Litigation Support Departments at two law firms. He expertise includes designing standardized workflows and project plans for electronic discovery projects to reduce review time saving tens of thousands of dollars for clients.

Dana Willis, Intellectual Property Paralegal, Foley & Lardner LLP. Prior to joining Foley & Lardner, Dana worked for 12 years in the litigation support field providing front line computer technical and eDiscovery support to Boston’s major law firms. He is currently continuing his education in data forensics and paralegal studies and possesses a Bachelor of Arts from Beloit College in Wisconsin. Dana is an Advisory Board member for Northern Essex Community College Computer Information Services and is a member of the High Tech Criminal Investigators Association (HTCIA). Dana has extensive knowledge of most common litigation document management software, such as EnCase’s FTK (Forensic ToolKit), Concordance, Relativity, Summation, and specializes in large data collection management. He is adept at providing cost-effective project management and liaising between clients, attorneys and vendors to access data in disparate and legacy databases for compliance in eDiscovery. Dana’s current personal research project focuses on the threat of alternate data streams and their obscure alternative deployments.

2010 Summit

Controlling the Cost of eDiscovery

The purpose of the 2010 Summit was to show how the scope and cost of ediscovery remain primarily matters of legal judgment rather than the mere application of algorithms. It is the attorney, not the technician, who provides the conceptual framework in which an ediscovery project is managed, regardless of the format of the data. The Summit provided practical advice that will allow the litigator to successfully manage complex ediscovery projects.

2010 Overview

The 2010 Boston eDiscovery Summit featured the following presentations:

Laura Zubulake, “the most famous plaintiff in the history of electronic discovery,” will speak on her experiences in the case of Zubulake v UBS Warburg, which laid the groundwork for the 2006 eDiscovery Amendments to the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure.

James Berriman, Esq., CEO of Evidox Corporation and former Director of Litigation Technology at Goodwin Procter LLP, will deliver a keynote address on how the attorney, not the technician, determines the appropriate scope of ediscovery.

A panel of experienced ediscovery practitioners, including a litigator, an ediscovery counsel, a litigation support manager, and a former ediscovery paralegal, will provide practical advice on cost-effective methods to manage ediscovery projects. The panel will be moderated by a reporter from the Boston Business Journal.

A panel of State and Federal judges will provide the view from the bench on how to address ediscovery issues and best practices for avoiding disputes and the risk of sanctions. The panel will be moderated by Maureen O’Rourke, Dean of Boston University School of Law.
Four years have passed since the 2006 ediscovery amendments to the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure. Many experienced litigators, however, remain unsure of how to take charge of an ediscovery project, how to push back effectively against unreasonable requests, and how to protect themselves and their clients from the risk of sanctions.

The experienced practitioner already understands that discovery is inherently limited by the traditional principles of relevance, scope, and undue burden. Fortunately, this knowledge can be directly applied to matters involving the large electronic repositories found on corporate networks.

The purpose of the Summit was to show how the scope and cost of ediscovery remain primarily matters of legal judgment rather than the mere application of algorithms. It is the attorney, not the technician, who provides the conceptual framework in which an ediscovery project is managed, regardless of the format of the data. The Summit providde practical advice that allows the litigator to successfully manage complex ediscovery projects.


2010 Speakers

Laura Zubulake. After earning an M.B.A. degree in economics from New York University, Ms. Zubulake began her career on Wall Street. As an executive in institutional equity departments, she consulted and marketed to portfolio managers at mutual, hedge, and pension funds concerning asset allocation, derivative securities, portfolio insurance, hedging strategies, macro-economics, and Asian company stock selection. In 1991, her book The Complete Guide to Convertible Securities Worldwide was published by John Wiley & Sons.

In 2003, Ms. Zubulake brought suit against former employer UBS Warburg. Strategic decisions she made in the course of that lawsuit resulted in landmark decisions concerning electronic discovery and influenced changes to the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure. In 2005, she was named by senior editors at Fast Company, a management magazine, as one of The Courageous Few, the “10 rare leaders who did the right thing.”

James Berriman, CEO, Evidox Corporation. Prior to co-founding Evidox, Mr. Berriman was a practicing AmLaw 100 litigator with a background in litigation technology. He has been developing and supporting litigation-technology systems since 1982. From 1990 to 2006, he was an attorney at Goodwin Procter LLP. As Senior Counsel and Director of Litigation Technology, he founded the firm’s Litigation Technology Group and grew it to a team of 15 specialists. He coded and implemented the firm’s litigation case-management system. He established the firm’s scanning and digitizing labs, its e-discovery review facilities, and its trial technology systems. He has presented electronic evidence at a number of prominent trials, including U.S. v. Martha Stewart and Peter Bacanovic. Mr. Berriman received his law degree cum laude from Boston University, where he was Articles Editor of the Boston University Law Review, and his bachelor’s degree summa cum laude from the State University of New York, Potsdam College.

First Panel – eDiscovery Practitioners

Shannon Capone Kirk, eDiscovery Counsel, Ropes & Gray LLP. Shannon Capone Kirk is E-Discovery Counsel at Ropes & Gray where she focuses exclusively on electronic discovery law. Shannon is a contributing author on two books on E-Discovery and has published numerous articles on the topic in publications such as: Law Technology News, Corporate Legal Times, National Law Journal, Sue Magazine. Shannon also conducts CLE courses for attorneys and routinely speaks on E-Discovery. Shannon is a member of Suffolk Law School’s adjunct faculty and will teach E-Discovery starting with Suffolk’s Spring 2011 semester. Shannon is a Sedona Conference Working Group Member of Electronic Document Retention and Production (WG1). Recognized as a “Rising Star” by Illinois Super Lawyers, Shannon’s practice is built upon her complex commercial litigation experience. In addition to working extensively on electronic discovery, she has litigated cases in state and federal courts across the country. She received her JD, cum laude, from Suffolk University Law School and her BA, magna cum laude, from St. John’s University.

Dana Conneally, National Manager of Litigation Technology, Goodwin Procter LLP. Mr. Conneally has been managing complex litigation discovery projects at Goodwin Procter since 2000. As Litigation Technology Manager, he is responsible for overseeing a team of sixteen ediscovery professionals across all Goodwin Procter offices. The ediscovery team provides services to clients that include electronic data preservation, collection, review, and production. In addition to managing the team, Dana is responsible for identifying developing technologies that can be utilized to mitigate risk, increase productivity, and reduce costs related to the discovery process. He holds a B.A. (1996) in Political Studies from Gordon College, and is six months shy of completing a J.D. from Suffolk University School of Law.

Lynn Turgeon, COO of Evidox Corporation. Prior to co-founding Evidox, Ms. Turgeon was a senior litigation paralegal and then Manager of Litigation Technology at Goodwin Procter LLP. She supervised and administered the litigation-support database systems for over 300 litigation attorneys and paralegals. She implemented the firm’s image database capabilities, its e-discovery production lines, and its native file processing capabilities. She administered the firm’s litigation-support extranet systems. She trained and supervised the e-discovery project managers and oversaw discovery lab operations. She was responsible for attorney training and she is one of the few Summation Certified Trainers in New England. Ms. has over 20 years of experience as a litigation paralegal.

Second Panel – Judges

Moderator: Maureen A. O’Rourke, Dean, Boston University School of Law. Dean O’Rourke joined the faculty of the School of Law in 1993 after working at IBM Corporation, where she handled a variety of issues surrounding software licensing. Her primary academic interests lie at the intersection of intellectual property law and other fields, such as contract and antitrust law, particularly in the context of software and high technology. Her scholarship has focused on such questions as whether intellectual property law should preempt particular terms of software license agreements. She was one of the first to consider comprehensively the status of hyperlinking on the Internet under copyright law and the viability of a trespass claim for access to and use of a Web site. She is a co-author of one of the leading copyright casebooks in the U.S., Copyright in a Global Information Economy (Aspen Law & Business). She has published articles in the law reviews of Columbia, Duke, Iowa and Minnesota, the technology journals of Berkeley, Harvard and Boston University, and other publications including the Journal of the Copyright Society. She is currently the associate reporter on the American Law Institute’s (ALI) Principles of Software Contracting project and is a member of the ALI. Prior to becoming Dean, she taught courses in commercial law and intellectual property law in addition to helping supervise the student-run Journal of Science and Technology Law. In May 2000, she became the School’s sixth recipient of the Metcalf Award, the University’s highest teaching honor. She served as acting dean for two years prior to accepting the post of Dean of the School of Law in 2006. She has lectured extensively and has been a visiting professor at Columbia University Law School and LaTrobe University in Australia.

Hon. F. Dennis Saylor IV, United States District Court Judge. Mr. Saylor received a B.S. from Northwestern University in 1977 and a J.D. from Harvard Law School in 1981. He was in private practice at Goodwin Procter from 1981 to 1987 and 1993 to 2004. He served as Assistant U.S. Attorney for the District of Massachusetts from 1987 to 1990. He was a Special counsel & chief of staff to the assistant attorney general of the Criminal Division, U.S. Department of Justice, Washington, DC from 1990 to 1993. Mr. Saylor became a federal judge on the United States District Court for the District of Massachusetts on June 2, 2004. He was nominated by President George W. Bush on July 30, 2003, to a seat vacated by Robert E. Keeton. He was confirmed by the United States Senate on June 1, 2004, and received his commission on June 2, 2004.

Hon. Timothy Hillman, Magistrate Judge, U. S. District Court, District of Massachusetts. Mr. Hillman was first appointed to the Court February 13, 2006. He received his B.A. from Coe College in 1970 and his J.D. from Suffolk University Law School, J.D., 1973.

Hon. Allan van Gestel, Justice, Massachusetts Superior Court (retired). Mr. van Gestel has more than 46 years of experience handling complex civil litigation matters and is an expert at resolving business and commercial disputes. Most recently, he served as the founding and presiding Justice of the innovative Business Litigation Session of the Massachusetts Superior Court, a position he held for seven years.